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20130706
20130714
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ends meet. they're finding a way to be happy and that environment. we see different purchase patterns. have notustomers who cut back on special events, holidays, christmas, memorial they'reher's day figuring out how to operate in a pretty uncertain environment. >> i think politics used to be about how we all lift each other up and increase. the recession has caused them to get in this caveman mentality. you cannot trust other people. the banks pulled one over on you and the regulators pulled one over on you. the sense that we share prosperity i think for a lot of people left. this issue where we have developed into a politics where it is about what more can we get. we bifurcated a little bit. you are in the business of trying to tell a community we can grow to gather. tell me about that. >> i do believe at the municipal level we are a level of government that has some trust from the population than some of the other levels of government. cities across america do the same basic function. it is not really matter the size of the city. yet to pick up the trash. link insignals have to the
: the colorado department of public health and environment is in charge of making sure the panels in the thousands of gallons of contaminated liquids in warehouses and manufacturing plants are disposed of properly. >> so those facilities are big. there's a lot of machinery left behind. that machinery needs to be decontaminated so that there is no cadmium left on that material. and that would be expensive. >> reporter: they say no state or federal cleanup dollars will be used. the tab, reported to be at $2.2 million job, belongs to abound. and if what's left of the company's resources don't cover it, property owners will be stuck with costs, as reusable inventory goes to other solar manufacturers. >> i think what you'll see is many of the materials that were left behind will end up in a recycling stream. >> reporter: the solar energy industry's association says despite the dangerous mess, solar is still the cleanest and most abundant form of energy today. >> it's unfortunate that they are bankrupt and out of business. but the technology that they relied upon, american innovation an
the internal mcleary environment in russia. as i said at the outset i agree with you as well that wherever we can as we try to do we have to try to work with russian our common interests and we have had success in that regard particularly on foreign-policy issues that we share. with regard to our support for democratic change and reform for those speaking out for a pluralistic society we have to despise the environment continue to work with the russians who are willing to work with us. we are not able to support them as fully and we still need to make support available in other ways and i will if confirmed he eager to work with all of you on the committee to look for more ways to do that. in addition we have to speak out as you said and as i said in my opening when we disagree and we have to work more intensively and more cohesively with our european allies and partners because when we speak together our concerns are even stronger. see let me ask you one question about the trade agreement. how worried are you about the ability of europe to be on -- we have seen over the past week france seems
or for the u.s. s are? or is? >> well, i think first of all, a stable international environment. for them to reach economic goals. you can't think about that ithout thinking about u.s.-china relations. and i think that's probably the main thing. particularly this new leading team. over and emphasizing over that we should build a new of relationship between powers. >> major powers. >> yeah. e should show the world that the emergence of a new major power doesn't necessarily mean chaos and war and so on. i think they're very interested in this, in trying to build it. politicians erican that go over there usually get a eally great welcome, even the ones that aren't so friendly. >> so, as i mentioned, i spent ast week in beijing with a number of senior security officials, including wearing the pla. uniforms of the it was really interesting. one of the themes that came of ugh was the theme strategicic mistrust. and the argument that was given as for example in iraq and afghanistan, a large number of american troops have been killed friendly ly by uk fire. nobody except real anglo folks purpose,
by the army or the police or by the citizenry. don't wish to see a dupoly environment held by the state. there's no way to make a gun safe. host: what about the regulations? you talked about a serial number on every gun. you write about it in the story. tell our viewers. question aboute what happens if a gun comes out bad. , if it is beyond repair within the factory. the answer is that this is a heavily regulated area. the receiver which is the part of the gun that makes it a gun, it does the firing, it told the round and contains the trigger housing. every single one of those made has to have a serial number. even if it comes out broken. if it comes out broken, that have to take a picture of cutting it in half and then send that to the federal government if the federal government asks for it. they have to document it. it is not as if there are people popping in at night and stealing chocolate. this is already regulated industry. norfolk, va., independent college. about: you were talking having guns designed to kill people and animals. do they talk about the number of people who have been kill
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5